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The Indexing Society of Canada / Société canadienne d’indexation (ISC/SCI) is Canada’s national association of indexers. We invite you to learn more about finding an indexer, our publications, conferences and events, resources for indexers, how to become a member, and the Society.


Find an indexer

Find an indexer in your subject area for your project.


Find resources

Find information about indexes, indexing practices, and training in indexing.

Attend an event

Visit an indexing get-together in your region or attend the annual conference.

Become a member

Join the Society and enjoy the benefits of membership.

Doing the right thing by the author and the reader

Over the last week, we’ve had a riveting discussion on the ISC-L forum.

It started because a Canadian indexer was indexing a book on racism in the US, and had asked an American indexer for advice on approaching the language. For the benefit of ISC-L forum readers, the American indexer posted the very useful guidance that she gave to the Canadian indexer.

That post started a flood of comments about our struggles in indexing books that deal with difficult issues.

We really want to do the right thing by the author and the reader.

As indexer Alicia Peres put it very eloquently:

As indexers, we are acutely aware that our work comes at the end of the publication process, and we must deal with the text as it has been written. Yet, in dealing with the terms readers are likely to look for, we are not without influence, both in educating readers through terminology and in how we select and word index listings.

Alicia wrote these words not for the forum, but in her invitation to Greg Younging, a Member of Opsakwayak Cree Nation in Northern Manitoba, the Indigenous Studies Program Coordinator at University of British Columbia Okanagan, and author of “Elements of Indigenous Style.”

And that is how she convinced Dr. Younging to come to Winnipeg to speak at our conference.

Learn first-hand from an author who has thought deeply about language when you come to the ISC/SCI conference on June 8-9.

Every Three Months a Treasure

The Indexer: The International Journal of IndexingEvery three months, a treasure lands in my mailbox. As I pull it out of the clear plastic envelope, and read the article titles laid out on the smooth pastel cover, I feel again how lucky I am to be a member of the indexing community.

As usual, The Indexer I am holding is full of smart—and sometimes humourous—information, advice, and stories on all things indexing.

How is it that they never run out of ideas?

Editor Maureen MacGlashan wrote about that in 2008 in an article titled “The Indexer: past, present, and future” for the occasion of The Indexer’s 50th anniversary. In the article Maureen says that in the early years, “Those who knew no better (and, from my own experience as editor, still know) saw no future for a journal dedicating to indexing…Editors were warned: ‘You’ll never be able to keep it up; you’ll find that by the end of another year you have completely exhausted all the possible aspects of indexing.’”

Maureen then explains why that did not happen, and why it wasn’t going to be a problem, at least not in 2008.

That was ten years ago. Would Maureen say the same today?

Well, get ready to ask her at our opening session at the ISC/SCI conference.

We’re thrilled to announce that Maureen is going to give us the lowdown on her years as editor of The Indexer, in an interview with Christine Jacobson. The conference is in Winnipeg June 8-9.

A Unique Plug-in Opportunity

At the 2014 Conference in Toronto, Margery Towery gave us one of her best indexing tips: plug yourself into the subject. If you index in the Humanities, or hope to start, you cannot get more plugged in to the human condition than by exploring the world’s story of human rights.

You will have your best opportunity when you come to Winnipeg for the conference June 8-9.

Indexing in the Humanities: visit the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights is the only museum in the world that explores human rights as a topic and an aspiration. The stories and interactive displays cover human rights through the ages and up to current times with a uniquely Canadian lens. The building’s stunning architecture gives you space to reflect on what you learn. And the stories of triumph will leave you inspired.

The museum is open from 10 am to 5 pm every day except Mondays, and stays open to 9 pm on Wednesdays.

Before you book your trip, consider making room in your travel plans to spend three to six hours at the CMHR.

P.S. If you plan to stay at the Fort Garry Hotel, phone to get the special rate with our Group Code. The code doesn’t work for online reservations.

Our Conference Venue – the Iconic Fort Garry Hotel

The Fort Garry Hotel, from The Canadian Railway Hotel Revisited: The Château-style Hotels of Ross & McFarlane by David Rose

The Fort Garry Hotel was built over a hundred years ago in Canada’s era of grand railway hotels. This was a time when the railways were encouraging well-heeled tourists to travel transcontinentally.

The Fort Garry has been designated a National Historic Site of Canada, due to its Château-style architecture. This distinctly Canadian architectural type was the signature style for many of the railway hotels, as well as some important public buildings in Ottawa. (Learn more about the Château style and railway hotels.)

Inside, the hotel’s Old World elegance blends with contemporary comfort and style. Overall, it’s an iconic Canadian landmark hotel.

As the Fort Garry is our conference venue, conference attendees can stay for a very good rate. All you have to do is use the Group Code which you’ll find on the conference page of our website here.

Save the date

Historic Fort Garry Hotel, venue for the ISC/SCI conferenceWinnipeg, June 8 – 9, 2018

Fort Garry Hotel

Navigating the confluence of text and context

Get into the flow and join us in Winnipeg for our 2018 conference.

  • Discover the best tips and techniques for your indexing practice
  • Explore new insights and ideas for your business and career
  • Meet and mingle with colleagues old and new

Winnipeg is an extraordinary city situated on the Canadian Prairie at the crossroads of ancient North American canoe routes. Consider lingering a while to experience the rich multicultural heritage, the prairie landscape, and illuminating attractions such as the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (“the world’s only museum that explores human rights as a concept and aspiration”) and the Winnipeg Art Gallery (the largest collection of Inuit art in the world).

To help you plan your travel, here’s the schedule of activities:

  • Thursday, June 7: a pre-conference event
  • Friday, June 8: breakfast, sessions from 9 until 5, and banquet dinner at 6:30
  • Saturday, June 9: breakfast, sessions from 9 until 5, followed by a reception at the conference hotel
  •  Sunday, June 10: a possible workshop or other event, to be announced in January.

Watch the 2018 Conference Page for more details and announcements.

We hope to see you there!

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