ISC/SCI Conference Program Announced

The ISC/SCI has set the program for the 2019 conference taking place in Ottawa on May 24 and 25.

In keeping with the conference theme, Beyond the Page—New Platforms, New Realities, the program offers a variety of topics that are timely and informative for new and experienced indexers alike.

Sessions on indexing practices include working with scholarly texts (Enid Zafran), biography and memoirs (Kendra Millis), structuring indexes (Fred Liese), and editing indexes “from the get-go” (Anne Fifer). Kate Mertes will talk about a growing and profitable market that you’ve probably never heard: of the indexing of locora.

Special sessions taking us “beyond the page” include

  • solutions toward decolonizing access and classification presented by a panel from the Indigenous Matters Committee of the Canadian Federation of Library Associations (they raised this issue in response to the Truth and Reconciliation Committee report)
  • a step into the world of parliamentary information—an underpinning of informed democratic engagement—with Martine Rocheleau and the House of Commons indexers on intelligence-based search
  • a discussion of ethics presented by Christine Jacobs and a panel of indexers and editors
  • business practices by Pierre Joyal
  • techniques that will change the way you work—physically and mentally—to restore energy and reduce stress, in a mini-workshop given by Ruth Paulauskas, founder of BreathWoRx

Following the conference on May 26 is a full-day workshop “Names: The Challenge of Indexing” by Enid Zafran.

Conference packages are available for Friday-only, Saturday-only, or both days. Full-time students receive a special reduced rate. As a reminder, we have discounted rates for accommodations.

Early Bird pricing is on now until April 15. Visit the conference page for the full conference agenda and links to the registration form.

Registration Now Open

The annual ISC/SCI conference in Ottawa is now open for Early Bird registration.

Take advantage of these early bird rates until April 15:

  • Members (including ASI, ANSZI, SI, all other affiliates and Editors Canada): $291 for full two-day conference, $159 for one day
  • Non-members: $344 for two-day conference, $211 for one day
  • Special rate for eligible full-time students: $158 for the two-day conference and $80 for one day.

And on Sunday we have a workshop “Names”, presented by Enid Zafran, $105.

All prices are in Canadian Dollars.

The program so far includes expert indexers on indexing scholarly work, indexing biographies and memoirs, and for our technical tool bag, structuring indexes, editing without pain, and indexing software. Specialty topics include Kate Mertes on the practice of indexing locora and the Ottawa Hansard indexers on the intelligence-based search engine for parliamentary information. We also have a number of special guests who you’ll hear more about soon.

Register now before Early Bird pricing ends April 15.

Does it spark joy?

Folded towels and Marie Kondo's bookMarie Kondo, the author of The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up, teaches a method to help us deal with the material items in our lives. In her Netflix series, “Tidying Up with Marie Kondo”, she helps desperate unhappy people who are wallowing in clutter by showing them how to get their houses in order once and for all. Her method includes techniques, such as folding laundry, as well as approaches toward material things, like thanking an item for its service before you discard it. To decide what to keep and what to let go, you ask yourself “Does this spark joy?”

Indexers know well the joy of finishing an index. It’s an intense process that can get away on you if you’re not careful. You’re not done just because you’ve typed in all the entries. You still have the editing, and that’s where it’s easy to go over budget. You’re conscientious about your work and you’re not going to turn in an index that doesn’t spark joy for your client.

Anne Fifer has a way to make editing less grueling. She is going to give us techniques, approaches, and more when she presents “Editing without pain: Getting your index in shape from the get-go” at the conference in Ottawa, May 24-25.

Applications are Open for the Mary Newberry Mentorship Program!

Stephen Ullstrom and Linda Christian, coordinators for the program, are excited to announce that the Mary Newberry Mentorship Program is now open to receive applications.

As announced at the ISC/SCI AGM in June 2018, this is a new initiative to help both new and mature indexers develop their skills and businesses, to promote excellence in indexing, and to foster relationships within the society.

This is also our first call for applications.

A few points to note:

  • Applications will be accepted on a rolling basis, and will be treated on a first-come-first-serve basis. So get your applications in early.
  • We will do our best to find an appropriate mentor, though we cannot guarantee a match or that a mentor will be available right away. We will reply within 30 days, at the latest, about the status of your application and whether we have been able to find a mentor.
  • As this will be the first cohort, we will be capping the number of concurrent mentorships at six. This cap may change in the future as the program progresses.
  • More information about the program is available at www.indexers.ca/mentorship.
  • To apply, please fill out and submit the application form and the career development exercise to mentorship@indexers.ca. The forms are also available at www.indexers.ca/mentorship.
  • Mentees accepted into the program will pay a $100 fee. This will be due after the mentee has been matched with a mentor.

Please ask if you have any questions. We are happy to answer.

We look forward to receiving your applications, and to fruitful mentorships.

Post Conference Workshop Announced

Indexing names sounds so easy.  But names indexing is so much broader than just people—it really encompasses all proper nouns and titles and places—and it requires lots of decision-making and judgment calls on the part of the indexer.  No matter what subject area you specialize in, you encounter these name-related issues.

You face the challenges of “foreign” or “ancient” cultures, the possibility of names changing over a lifetime, and countries with former names, present names, and official names.  You encounter royals, religious figures, fictional characters, and pseudonyms.

Authors introduce their own wrinkles into our jobs, creating confusion with multiple spellings, and setting up expectations that we don’t even know about in terms of what we should include and exclude from the index.

As our presenter Enid L. Zafran says, “There is so much to talk about in terms of indexing names that we need a whole day devoted to it.”

And that is why the ISC/SCI has chosen to offer a full-day post-conference workshop on “Names” conducted by Enid.  She will tell us short-cuts and strategies for entry methods, detail what to include in a entry like parenthetical glosses, how many postings to make per “name,” explain when a name is indexable, and discuss the sorting requirements.  Practical advice about dealing with clients and pricing the indexing are interspersed throughout.

To solidify your learning, the workshop includes two hands-on exercises where you’ll practice your new knowledge in expertly navigating names issues.

Please note that this is also the last event of Enid’s public-speaking career—she is hanging up her “presenter” hat, and you won’t want to miss out on this final chance to hear one of the most popular U.S. indexing experts. She has given talks at past ISC/SCI conferences as well as numerous chapter and national conferences in the United States.  Her books and articles have offered guidance to many of us for the past few decades.  We are honored that Enid has chosen to end this part of her career by coming to Ottawa and spending the day with us!

The ISC/SCI conference is in Ottawa on May 24 – 25, and the “Names” workshop will be held May 26. Registration for both will be on the conference page in a few weeks.

Library Archives Canada: a national, accessible treasure

Credit: Library Archives Canada

One thing that we love about indexing is the opportunity to read books that we might not discover on our own.

There is another other group that encounters interesting books on the job—the people at Library Archives Canada. This government organization is responsible for preserving Canada’s documentary heritage in all its mediums and formats.

“Preserved heritage” might conjure up the image of books and documents locked away in dark, dry vaults, accessible only with permission granted by secretive bureaucrats. It turns out that the vaults are real, but the access is generous and the “secrecy” is untrue.

In the spirit of the concept that heritage belongs to the people of Canada, LAC puts content online for the public. Besides providing searchable databases, they produce podcasts on the collections and accompany them with Flickr albums. They have a YouTube channel with archival videos and recordings. One initiative still going strong is “Project Naming”, in which they “digitize and identify, through Facebook and Twitter, the Inuit, First Nations and Métis peoples and communities seen in historical photos from our collection.”

Credit: Library Archives Canada

About the vaults, LAC offers a guided tour of their state-of-the-art Preservation Centre. It’s in Gatineau, Quebec, just across the river from downtown Ottawa, which is where we’re having our annual conference May 24-25. You can view the photos of the facility on their Flickr album here, and visit our conference page here.

A Gift to Yourself

In an interview, David Allen, the creator of “Getting Things Done”, described a Year End Review that will motivate and inspire you for the year ahead.

First, bring closure and acknowledgement for the past year. By yourself, or together with your partner, make a list of all your accomplishments. It’s likely you’ll find that your perspective has changed—which can be enlightening and satisfying. Also, ask yourself what has been left unfinished.

Second, take some time to clean a space in your house. David compares the effect to “discovering the fresh breeze that blows through your brain when you clean a drawer in your desk.” He adds, “Cleaning a space gives you a place to make those New Years ideas and new directions and new habits come from a much more natural and organic place.” Reserve a day, or even half a day, to clean and let the creativity flow.

When that is done, block some time and ask yourself, what do you want to be true next year? What does that look like? What do you want less of than last year, and what do you want more of?

Does your vision for 2019 include more socializing and networking? Professional development? Fun and adventure? A gift to yourself? Then write on the top of your list, “Book travel for ISC/SCI Conference in Ottawa, May 24-25”. You can visit the conference page here.

Conflicting Views

View of Tete Carre in Nice (not the Canadian War Museum)

Have you ever indexed a scholarly book with views that you disagree with? It would have felt good to ignore the offending paragraphs or put quotes around the headings you dislike. But you did the right thing and treated the material with same unbiased analysis that you gave to the rest of the book. The author has the right to his views, and you have the duty to index them.

It might be a comfort to know that your index exposes content that could be re-examined by future scholarship. As historian David Bercuson said, “No serious scholar…should be saved from the age-old processes of historical review, revision and re-writing to reflect more recent research when it is more accurate.”

The scholars Bercuson was referring to are authors as well as museum staff, and the topic was the exhibit on the Combined Offensive of World War II at the Canadian War Museum.

After the new building opened in 2005, war veterans complained loudly about a panel text which they believed portrayed the Allied bombing of German cities as “terror bombing and akin to war crime.” The museum stood by its words. The fight escalated with both sides bringing in historians to weight in. When the conflict was over, the museum director had been forced out and the panel text was revised, almost by committee.

Four years later, Bercuson, who was pressed into consulting on the exhibit, wrote about his experience and his evaluation of the text. It’s a fascinating look at how historians work and think about scholarship.

The Canadian War Museum is both a history museum and a place for reflection and contemplation. You can visit the museum when you come to Ottawa for the ISC/SCI Conference May 24-25, 2019.

Save the Date for ISC/SCI Conference in Ottawa

Ceremonial Guard Band on Parliament Hill
Ceremonial Guard Band on Parliament Hill (Ottawa Tourism)

Mark your calendar for the ISC/SCI annual conference on May 24-25, 2019, in Ottawa, Ontario.

The conference theme,“Beyond the Page—New Platforms, New Realities”/«Au-delà de la page—nouvelles plateformes, nouvelles réalités» recognizes that the publishing and information world continues to bring new challenges and new opportunities. At this conference, we’ll fine-tune our indexing practices, grow our business skills, offer our support and encouragement to newcomers, and pick the brains of those who have experience.

Ottawa is more than the political centre of Canada. It’s also home to some of the nation’s most important cultural venues. (Our conference site, which is on the University of Ottawa campus in the city’s centre, is just across the street from the new Ottawa Art Gallery.)

To help you plan your travel, here’s the draft schedule of activities:

  • Thursday, May 23: a late afternoon or evening pre-conference event
  • Friday, May 24: Breakfast around 8, sessions from 9 until 5, followed by our banquet dinner
  • Saturday, May 25: Breakfast around 8, sessions from 9 until 5, followed by a post-conference event
  • Sunday, May 26: we’re leaving room for a possible workshop or other event

Watch the conference page for more details and announcement in the weeks to come.

The new Bulletin is here

The post-conference issue of the Bulletin is now here. In this issue:

  • Stephen Ullstrom reports on the ISC/SCI conference in Winnipeg and gives us the highlights and take-aways.
  • Maureen MacGlashan talks to Christine Jacobs about her fascinating career as a diplomat in some of the world’s hotspots, her experiences as editor of The Indexer, and her thoughts on what makes a gifted indexer.
  • Moira Calder reports from Cleveland on a Special Interest Group meeting and the sessions at the ASI Conference.

Plus, there’s the Ewart-Daveluy and Tamarack award winners, Executive Committee activities, membership news—and the crossword puzzle!

This issue was brought to you through the efforts of the Ad Hoc Bulletin Policy Committee. They sourced a new design, layout, and template, developed a more efficient workflow, and tested it all in producing this issue.

Now it’s time to put Bulletin production in the hands of a managing editor. Could that be you? If you have editing experience, a desire to put things together and be at the helm, and are interested in bringing ISC/SCI’s news to your fellow members and to the world, the committee would like to hear from you. Send an email to bulletin_editor@indexers.ca and let them know.